Event Exhibition


MÜSZI

excuse me

My work is a pair of ordinary aluminium shields, 60 by 200 cm, mounted on a lamppost high above the traffic, like a usual sign, giving directions to the drivers showing for example the way to a certain city. But the text says “sorry”. I made three bilingual versions: Slovakian–Hungarian, Romanian–Hungarian, (both were exhibited in both countries), and a Romani–Hungarian one.

Opening ceremony: május 21. 16.00

My work is a pair of ordinary aluminium shields, 60 by 200 cm, mounted on a lamppost high above the
traffic, like a usual sign, giving directions to the drivers showing for example the way to a certain city.
But the text says “sorry”. I made three bilingual versions: Slovakian–Hungarian, Romanian–Hungarian,
(both were exhibited in both countries), and a Romani–Hungarian one.
While this utterly simple and ordinary way of apologizing is an everyday occurrence in Japan, the
expression, for instance, is used only a third as much frequently in Germany than in Japan. No similar
investigations have been made in Hungary, but based on personal experience, I think I am right to
assume that apologizing happens rather rarely in this country, in private and public spheres alike. Thus,
it is by no means an everyday routine, even though we presumably have roughly as much reason to say
sorry to our fellow citizens as people in Japan. Probably we would feel more at ease, both in our private
lives as in the public sphere, if we practised this gesture, i.e., admitting our mistakes, faults, ignorance,
foolishness, selfishness, stupidity or intolerance, and voicing our regret more frequently for any
misunderstanding, confusion, offence or exposure that such an act may have led to – right here and
now. Not to mention that we tend to counterbalance our bad conscience about our failure to say sorry
with aggression, self-conceit and intolerance – again both in our private and public lives.

This is why I think that in the chaos of urban visuality, amidst the deluge of advertisements, signposts,
graffiti and billboards, such a consciously simple piece could have a strong effect. The first question it
raises is who might be the person who wants to apologize here and now, and for what and to whom?
The very task of interpretation may take the viewer on more distant routes, since one has to admit that

SORRY according to her/his current disposition.
Shields with the Hungarian text (elnézést) were realized six times between 2004 and 2008. From 2009
on beside the Hungarian text the sorry can be read in another language too. The bilingual versions

were:

Sept. 2009 Romanian – Hungarian version, Târgu Mureș, Romania

Oct. 2009 Slovakian – Hungarian version, Dunaújváros, Hungary

Dec. 2009 Slovakian – Hungarian version, Bratislava, Slovakia

Apr. 2010 Romanian – Hungarian version, Budapest, Hungary

Aug. 2010 Roma – Hungarian version, Pécs, Hungary

Sept. 2013 Slovenian – German version, at the Austrian – Slovenian border

Participating artist: János Sugár

Curator: Júlia Salamon

Organizer: Müszi

More information:

http://muszi.org

http://pecs2010.blog.hu/2010/07/06/21_parbeszed_18_19_sugar_janos_elnezest_harmadik_szinhaz_budai_vam

http://kepgyar.blog.hu/2010/07/30/cigany_elnezest_pecsen

http://www.bama.hu/baranya/kozelet/cigany-nyelvu-elnezest-tabla-pecsen-321389

http://nacikhaza.blogspot.com/2010/08/cigany-nyelvu-elnezest-tabla-pecsen.html

 

Sugár János (1958, Budapest) lives and works in Budapest.